Gradita traduzione

     

    The Washington Post’s mission has been to create a “moral panic” sufficient to cause the Obama administration to overcome the objections of Senate Democrats and adopt the “Grand Bargain” (sic).  The deal would actually constitute the Grand Betrayal.  The betrayal of Democratic Party principles and promises would inflict a recession through massive austerity via large cuts to the safety net and social programs and modest/moderate increases in revenues.

    Throughout December, the Post flogged the “fiscal cliff” as its panique du mois.  Using the “fiscal cliff” to panic Obama into the Grand Betrayal required the Post’s writers to panic us through two simultaneous, contradictory moral rants (1) it was essential to prevent the fiscal cliff by agreeing to the “Grand Bargain” (sic, Grand Betrayal) immediately because austerity would doom us to falling back into recession absent a deal and (2) it was essential that the “Grand Bargain” (sic) impose even more severe austerity than the “cliff” – for a full decade – because only austerity could save us.

    The fact that the Post’s deficit hawks felt that their best way to panic Obama into agreeing to austerity was to scream that the “fiscal cliff’s” austerity would cause a disaster and must be avoided by adopting the Grand Betrayal’s even greater austerity reveals that they knew they had no coherent argument in favor austerity as a response to the Great Recession.  They would not have picked an internally contradictory argument if they had a logical alternative.

    The Post’s reporters and columnists have drunk Pete Peterson’s punch.  Peterson is the Republican Wall Street billionaire who is devoting the remainder of his life and $1 billion to pushing his assault on the safety net and spending on social programs.  Peterson’s ultimate goal is to privatize Social Security so that Wall Street can obtain hundreds of billions of dollars in fees off managing our retirement savings.  The Post’s hawks have seen austerity throw the Eurozone back into a gratuitous recession, but remain eager to inflict austerity on us even though they predict it will cause a recession.

    The questions I had about the Post’s coverage once the “fiscal cliff” deal was struck were how long would it take them to try to generate a new moral panic demanding prompt passage of the Grand Betrayal how would they deal with their contradictory messages that austerity was the problem and the solution?  The combination of sharp cuts to spending and moderate/modest increases in taxes constitutes severe austerity for an economy that is still performing far below capacity and suffers severe unemployment and underemployment.  The Grand Betrayal’s austerity is likely to throw us back into recession.  Because the austerity will last for a decade it could inflict multiple recessions us and make those recessions more severe.  How would they try to make more frequent and severe recessions attractive to the public?

    The answer to the first question of how long it would take the hawks to renew their efforts to induce a new moral panic about deficits was less than 24 hours.  The answer to the second question varied by the deficit hawk writer.  I wrote a column about Robert Samuelson’s relentless efforts to panic the public in October 2012 entitled:  “Robert J. Samuelson tries to create a moral panic about deficits.”  I exposed in that column, and a follow-up column, his mendacious description of another Pete Peterson outfit (“Third Way”) as a “liberal” group that supported his position.  It’s actually Wall Street on the Potomac.

    http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2012/10/robert-j-samuelson-tries-to-create-a-moral-panic-about-deficits.html

    The aspect I liked best about Samuelson’s column was that he was demanding that the millions of additional workers lose their jobs through a gratuitous recession he admitted that inflicting austerity would cause accept their fate without protest.  It’s unpleasant for us when you, or your hungry kid; whines all night after we cut your SNAP (food stamps).  It is impossible to compete with unintentional self-parody.

    Well, Samuelson is back, and pissed as hell at Obama for not getting the Grand Betrayal past Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid – who literally threw Obama’s suggest instrument of surrender into his burning fireplace.  As soon as the “fiscal cliff” deal reached Samuelson thundered that it represented at a “failure of presidential leadership” because Obama did not agree to Republican demands for austerity as a response to the Great Recession.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/robert-j-samuelson-obamas-leadership-failure/2012/12/31/fa34a9b6-5393-11e2-8b9e-dd8773594efc_story.html?hpid=z7

    Samuelson laments first that the “fiscal cliff” deal slightly increases the marginal income tax rate for the richest two percent of us.  Their highest marginal rate will remain dramatically lower than in any modern war.   Seriously, that’s Samuelson’s top concern?  Samuelson claims:

    “The obsession with rates is bad policy (higher rates may threaten risk-taking, work effort and hiring) but qualifies as good politics: It signals Obama is macho; he’s tough on the rich, who are implicitly blamed for the nation’s budget and economic woes.”

    So many untruths in two sentences: one, it’s not an obsession, it’s a deal on taxes and marginal rates are what have been lowered repeatedly for the wealthiest Americans.  If Samuelson were serious about a “deficit crisis” he would be pushing over the longer term for much higher taxes on the wealthy.  Samuelson, however, is a Peterson stooge and shares Wall Street’s continuing demands for ever lower income taxes on the wealthiest one-to-two percent.

    Two, there is no credible evidence that a minor, partial return, still well below modern historical norms, in the highest marginal rate will have any negative effects on “risk-taking, work effort, and hiring.”  We have experienced our worst, negative growth, under our lowest marginal tax rates for the extremely wealthy.

    Inequality has surged and yes, the top people in finance, who represent a disproportionate share of the wealthiest Americans are by far the most culpable people for the Great Recession.  It was their frauds that made far too many of them wealthy and caused the greatest loss of middle class wealth in at least 75 years.  So, on any grounds of fairness the wealthiest Americans should have never have gotten these tax cuts and the maze of tax advantages they abuse to pay marginal tax rates that are often lower than their employees.

    Being responsive to unfairness produced by power and the abuse of power is a good thing in a democracy.  What Samuelson is describing is good democracy, not simply politics.

    No one thinks Obama is macho.  The media accounts from 2011 and the current deal are consistent in describing him as a weak negotiator saved from disaster by Senate liberals and Tea Party Republicans in the House.

    But Samuelson soon gets to the Peterson agenda – Social Security is first on his list for betrayal.

    “The larger cause is that Obama refuses to concede that Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are driving future spending and deficits. So when Republicans make concessions on taxes (as they have), they get little in return. Naturally, this poisons the negotiating climate.”

    How did Social Security make it to first on his list?  It is producing surpluses, not deficits.  Samuelson loathes the AARP and literally blames older Americans for “ruin[ing] America.”  He thinks grandpa is a fifth columnist leech.  He pines for the day in when the Paul Ryans of the world will have the “courage” to throw grandpa under the bus.  Here’s the title and the link to his article denouncing “the elderly.”

    Why are we in this debt fix? It’s the elderly, stupid.

    http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2011-07-28/opinions/35236744_1_social-security-federal-government-budget-and-debt

    Medicaid also does not belong on the list.  We can substantially reduce Medicaid expenditures by reducing unemployment and poverty.  Unemployment and poverty cause enormous economic waste.  We can virtually eliminate long-term unemployment at any time we wish by creating a federal jobs guarantee program that would also significantly increase growth.  If we reduce unemployment dramatically we will also reduce poverty substantially.  Medicaid is a program for those at or near poverty.

    That leaves Medicare, which does in fact, overwhelmingly, drive the long-term CBO projections that Samuelson often cites.  I will return to Samuelson’s arguments about long-term budget issues, but there is a more immediate point that must be emphasized here – nothing he argues (even if it were true) would justify austerity now.  Imposing austerity now would make all of the difficulties he cites far greater

    There is no economic rationale for inflicting austerity on an economy in our circumstances.  We are suffering from a jobs crisis, not a debt crisis.  Samuelson concedes that:  “A weak economy creates few new jobs, and the lack of jobs is the nation’s No. 1 social problem.”  When there is a recession unemployment grows substantially, causing the national government’s revenues to fall sharply and increasing its expenditures, e.g., for unemployment compensation.  (The opposite effect occurs during rapid growth if inflation begins to develop.)  This process is part of the automatic fiscal stabilizers we and other prudent nations have built into our economies.  The result is an automatic (no delays to pass new legislation) counter-cyclical fiscal policy that reduces the severity of economic crises.  Recessions are now, on average, far less severe and long-lived than before automatic stabilizers.

    We are not suffering, however, from an average recession.  It is called the Great Recession because it is much more severe than a typical recession.  As Samuelson concedes, in the recovery from a Great Recession demand will be severely inadequate and far too employers will hire, making jobs the number one problem.  To increase jobs and recover more quickly from a Great Recession it is essential that the federal government step forward to replace the lost demand.   The last thing one wants is for the federal government to inflict austerity through (net) tax increases and (net) spending reductions.  Obama’s failure of leadership was not getting the payroll tax reduced.  He should not have made expenditure cuts “in return” to the Republicans for tax increases to the wealthiest because that would have harmed the recovery, as Samuelson has conceded.  Obama should have lowered the payroll tax and rates for the working and middle class to ensure there was no net increase in taxes.  Reducing those taxes would have greatly added to private sector demand, which would speed the recovery.

    Austerity is a pro-cyclical policy – it makes the recession more severe.  It is as economically illiterate as bleeding a patient is medically illiterate.  In a moment of clarity (soon obscured by analytical incoherence), a Post reporter, Zachary Goldfarb, concedes this point in the first clauses of his first sentence.

    “The deal to which the House gave final approval late Tuesday will head off the most severe effects of the “fiscal cliff” by averting a dangerous dose of austerity….”

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/fiscal-cliff/fiscal-cliff-deal-does-little-to-tame-threats-from-debt-ceiling-high-unemployment-rates/2013/01/01/8e4c14aa-5393-11e2-bf3e-76c0a789346f_story.html

    Very good:  “austerity” is “dangerous” and will have “severe effects” on our economy.  It needed to be “head[ed] off.”

    Goldfarb notes that the agreement fails to “defuse” the Republican Party’s threat to use the debt ceiling to extort President Obama by threatening to cause a default unless he agrees to inflict austerity on the Nation.  That’s a fair and important criticism that Samuelson ignores because it would refute his claim of Republican virtue spurned by Obama.  It is logically consistent with Goldfarb’s prior argument – austerity would be disaster.

    Goldfarb’s next major point is also logically coherent.

    “Nor does the package do anything to address stubbornly high levels of unemployment, with 12 million Americans out of work. Instead, the deal could aggravate the problem. By allowing the payroll tax cut to expire, the deal takes money out of the hands of many Americans, sucking it out of the economy and slowing economic activity.”

    Again, the consistent point being made is that austerity would be self-destructive.  Then things come unhinged.

    “And, finally, the deal is too modest to fundamentally tame the government’s soaring debt. The nation’s long-term finances remain in peril, with federal spending projected to rise dramatically as a wave of retiring baby boomers turns to the government for help in paying for ever-more-costly health care.”

    Suddenly, the problem is that the deal inflicts too little austerity.  Immediately after explaining that austerity would “slow economic activity” the writer claims, that the deal imposes too little austerity.  He makes the claim not as a matter of opinion, but of fact.  He makes his assertion with no apparent understanding of his internal inconsistency.  Note that he does, implicitly, concede that the key issues are health care costs and Medicare rather than Social Security or Medicaid.

    The article then appears to recover, only to plunge into total incoherence.

    Some benefits

    “Despite the drawbacks, the bipartisan deal may well have been the heaviest lift a deeply divided Congress could have accomplished. And the package, no doubt, has its benefits.

    It is likely to prevent the nation from dipping back into recession. It cancels massive tax increases facing middle-class and poor Americans. And it delays deep and blunt government spending cuts for two months.

    And while the agreement does nothing to reduce joblessness, it renews unemployment benefits that would have otherwise expired, offering vital help to the jobless and averting another blow to economic activity.

    And finally, by raising a little more than $600 billion in fresh tax revenue from the wealthy, the deal takes a step toward bringing spending and taxes into line for the next few years — though economists say much more needs to be done over the long run.

    President Obama had sought a larger agreement that would raise taxes by more than double what he got in the deal. He also wanted to take the debt ceiling off the table and offset deep spending cuts with more taxes and more targeted savings in entitlements — including Medicare and Social Security. He also asked for new economic stimulus measures to help bring down unemployment, including an extension of the payroll tax holiday.

    Republicans had also wanted a deal that would cut the deficit more, though their prescription was different from Obama’s. Instead of taxes, they preferred deeper cuts to domestic spending
    and changes to entitlements.”

    The first two sentences remain coherent – by avoiding austerity the deal prevents us from being thrown into recession.  That is an incredibly important thing.

    The third sentence slides into an internal contradiction.

    “And while the agreement does nothing to reduce joblessness, it renews unemployment benefits that would have otherwise expired, offering vital help to the jobless and averting another blow to economic activity.”

    Goldfarb has just explained that the deal is likely to prevent a recession by blocking the “fiscal cliff’s” austerity (tax increases and spending cuts), so it does an enormous amount to “reduce joblessness” by blocking austerity.  But Goldfarb misses an even more direct self-contradiction.  Extended unemployment benefits were lapsing, so extending the benefits to roughly two million recipients will provide increased demand that will “reduce joblessness.”

    It gets worse.  Goldfarb’s next sentence begins an ode to austerity.

    “And finally, by raising a little more than $600 billion in fresh tax revenue from the wealthy, the deal takes a step toward bringing spending and taxes into line for the next few years — though economists say much more needs to be done over the long run.”

    No, the (net) tax increase is an austerity provision.  Austerity does not necessarily “bring spending and taxes into line for the next few years.”  It is far more likely to do what Goldfarb wrote earlier – cause a gratuitous recession in which case it will certainly increase unemployment and likely increase the deficit.

    Goldfarb’s fifth sentence takes him further off course (but shows that Samuelson got his criticism of Obama completely wrong).

    “President Obama had sought a larger agreement that would raise taxes by more than double what he got in the deal. He also wanted to take the debt ceiling off the table and offset deep spending cuts with more taxes and more targeted savings in entitlements — including Medicare and Social Security. He also asked for new economic stimulus measures to help bring down unemployment, including an extension of the payroll tax holiday.”

    Goldfarb showed what many of us began warning about before the 2012 election.  Obama wanted to enter into the Great Betrayal in 2011, 2012, and the start of 2013.  He wanted to inflict “deep spending cuts with more taxes and more targeted savings in … Medicare and Social Security….”  Note that Goldfarb is describing Obama’s incoherence on austerity.  Remember, had Obama succeeded in July or November 2011 in achieving his goal – the Great Betrayal – he would have inflicted a program of austerity that would have forced the U.S. back into recession, caused a severe increase in unemployment, destroyed his reelection chances, and cost Democrats the Senate.  Obama’s key advisors in fall 2011 – Treasury Secretary Geithner, Chief of Staff William Daley, and OMB head Jacob Lew – are all representatives of the Wall Street wing of the Democratic Party who generally oppose stimulus and support austerity.  Lew is considered the leading candidate to replace Geithner as Treasury Secretary.

    “[Obama] wanted to take the debt ceiling off the table and offset deep spending cuts with more taxes and more targeted savings in entitlements — including Medicare and Social Security.”

    I understand that Goldfarb is setting out Obama’s goal here, but the failure to understand economics is so fundamental and vital to the story that if Goldfarb had spotted Obama’s error he would have pointed it out in the article.  Obama thought that “deep spending cuts … and more targeted savings in … Medicare and Social Security” would “offset” “more taxes.”  When the topic is austerity, “spending cuts” do not “offset” “more taxes” – they compound austerity.  Obama wanted a double-barreled blast of austerity (spending cuts plus tax increases) aimed at our economy.  Had he succeeded, he would have blasted us into a recession.  Goldfarb and Obama appear to believe, however, that tax increases and spending cuts “offset” each other when it comes to austerity, as the next sentence of the article confirms.  “[Obama] also asked for new economic stimulus measures to help bring down unemployment, including an extension of the payroll tax holiday.”  Yes, that request was for stimulus, but neither Obama nor Goldfarb appear to understand that the net effects of tax changes and spending changes are the key to determining whether the overall budget inflicts austerity or provides stimulus.  In both spending and taxes the net effect of the budgetary changes that Obama sought through the deal was the infliction of severe austerity on the Nation that would have forced us into recession.

    Similarly, Goldfarb’s description of the even more self-destructive austerity program that the Republicans sought to inflict on the Nation demonstrates that neither he nor the Republicans understand economics.

    “Republicans had also wanted a deal that would cut the deficit more, though their prescription was different from Obama’s. Instead of taxes, they preferred deeper cuts to domestic spending and changes to entitlements.”

    The key error here is subtle but critical – the assumption that even “deeper cuts to domestic spending and [the safety net]” would “cut the deficit more” than Obama’s proposal.  Obama and the Republicans were both trying to inflict austerity on the Nation, at a time when we were still years from full recovery from the Great Recession.  As Goldfarb explained at the start of his article, such austerity was likely to force the U.S. into recession (as it did the Eurozone).  A new recession would increase unemployment, dramatically reduce tax revenues, and increase expenditures.  The most likely result is that the deficit would increase under both the Republican and Obama plans.  The recession, unemployment, and the deficit would have been worse under the Republican plan than the Obama plan because their plan sought to inflict the greatest self-destructive austerity.

    A recession occurs when demand is so inadequate that economic growth becomes negative, which is what drives large increases in unemployment and underemployment.  The assumption of proponents of austerity is that if there is a $1 trillion federal budget deficit and we raise taxes by $500 billion and cut spending by $500 billion the budget will be balanced.  This assumes that the federal budget has no effect on the economy.  No one thinks that assumption is true.  Everyone now agrees that inflicting austerity on the Nation would be stupid and likely to force us back into recession.  That is why they now agree that the fiscal cliff had to be avoided – it was a program of austerity.  (Governor Dean is the exception that proves the rule.  He wanted us to deliberately go off the “fiscal cliff” in order to inflict severe austerity on the Nation.  He predicted that it would only cause a six-month recession and then enthused about how the sacrifices made (by others, the unemployed, not him) would make America a much better place.  He sounded like your Grandmother touting the benefits of her enema.)  In any event, even a physician like Dean now admits that inflicting austerity would force us back into a recession.  This is what has austerity did to the Eurozone (except that Spain, Greece, and Italy have Great Depression-levels of unemployment).

    The news accounts about fiscal cliff, however, rarely explain why inflicting its austerity would cause a recession and make the deficit larger rather than balancing our budget.  Here’s the shorter version:  raising taxes in response to the Great Recession reduces private sector demand – in an economy that already has massively inadequate demand.  Cutting federal spending obviously reduces public sector demand, but it indirectly reduces private sector demand.  The vast bulk of federal expenditures do not go to pay federal workers’ pay, but to purchase goods and services from the private sector.  (Federal workers’ spending also goes overwhelmingly to the private sector.)  By further reducing demand, austerity makes the recession worse or forces the Nation back into recession or even depression, which causes unemployment and underemployment to rise.  The fall in employment reduces federal revenues and increases federal expenses.  The net result, therefore, of austerity in response to the Great Recession is to make the federal budget deficit, the recession, human misery (as a result of the cuts to spending), and unemployment larger.  Austerity is often a lose-lose-lose-lose strategy.  Stimulus in response to a Great Recession is likely to have the opposite effect because it increases growth, employment, and federal revenues while decreasing misery and federal financial assistance.  By increasing revenues and decreasing expenditures for those who would have been unemployed a stimulus program can reduce the budget deficit.  Stimulus can be a win-win-win-win strategy.

    To be more precise, what matters is the net change.  It is fine to kill stupid governmental programs and add funding to superior programs.  The mix matters on both the spending and tax side, but a $50 billion job training program is not magic, it will not cause a surge in employment unless we restore adequate demand to support sharp rises in employment.  One of President Obama’s best ideas was a large revenue sharing program (a Republican innovation) because he knew that the Great Recession would cause budgetary crises in many states and localities.  States and localities do not have sovereign currencies and they cannot run deficits the way a nation with a sovereign currency should as part a counter-cyclical policy.  Left to their own devices, states and localities respond to a Great Recession in a pro-cyclical fashion – they fire workers and cut spending when our recovery would be much faster if they were hiring.  (The labor statistics have been showing this perverse pro-cyclical impact for over a year.)  What we really need is a jobs guarantee program that would provide a job to everyone willing and able to work.  Neither Party, however, supports such a program.

    Reducing taxes for the wealthy is a bad way to respond to a recession because it does not increase their consumption as much as would tax cuts to less wealthy workers.  The single best tax reduction is to stop collecting the payroll tax.  It provides immediate stimulus at no material administrative expense.  The payroll tax is our most regressive tax, so cutting it creates the greatest percentage boost to demand.  It helps those who need the relief.  The single worst decision involving the “fiscal cliff” was the refusal to extend the partial moratorium on collecting the payroll tax.

    As with spending, the net change in taxes is what matters.  We could increase the marginal tax rate for the wealthy and make greater cuts in taxes for those who were not wealthy, particularly by a moratorium on collecting the payroll tax. The net effect would be stimulus in response to the Great Recession and for the reasons I explained the payroll tax moratorium has a far greater stimulus effect than would a comparable tax reduction for the wealthiest Americans.

    With that macro-economic review in mind we can cut through most of the nonsense chatter that discussions of the fiscal cliff generated.  We do not want to make a “down payment” on deficit reduction at this time.  That phrase is code for inflicting lose-lose-lose-lose austerity.  It would make on a down payment on inflicting a gratuitous recession.

    The time to consider raising (net) taxes and/or cutting (net) spending is when we are about to reach full employment and inflation is becoming a serious concern.  Both of those factors need to be present.  If we have full employment without serious inflation we will have very strength growth and the federal deficit will be coming down.  You may have read from Peterson’s acolytes that we have a long-term “structural” budgetary “crisis” that must be addressed now by austerity.  Our review has shown why that is false.  It is the Great Recession that caused the large increase in deficits.  That is what recessions do.  That is why it is so insanely self-destructive to inflict a gratuitous recession via austerity on the purported grounds of the need to cut the deficit.

    It is economic growth and recovery that causes deficits to fall sharply.  Because the U.S. has had the sense not to inflict austerity (the eurozone’s disastrous policy) we have not been forced into a recession.  The stimulus was far smaller than it should have been, but it has been sufficient to produce economic growth and the federal deficit has fallen at record rates over the last years.  There is no deficit or debt crisis – as the long-term U.S. bond rate demonstrates every day.

    There is one clear structural issue for our economy – the fact that health care costs have been rising much faster than the economy grows.  Social Security poses no such issue.  Health care costs matter because they use real resources, and real resources, unlike “money,” are scarce even for a nation like the U.S. that has the sense to maintain a sovereign currency.  (Nations that adopted the euro had to abandon their sovereign currencies.)  I have explained these points in some detail previously so I will only hit the most essential points here.

    http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2012/11/applebees-obamacare-rant-reveals-the-lies-of-the-deficit-hysteria.html

    Here are the three things you need to understand to cut through the hysteria about health care costs, which debt hawks portray as a “structural” “crisis” for Medicare and Medicaid.  First, if they are right that health care costs are going to continue to increase far more rapidly than the economy grows for the next 70 years, then Medicare and Medicaid are the least of our problems.  We are unique among nations with a developed economy (but underdeveloped understanding of economics).  We pay for health care costs primarily through private insurance and we have no effective cost-containment system.  That combination is an idiotic recipe and if we assume that we will never learn from our experience, or the experience of our peer nations, then health care costs will continue to grow far faster than our GDP.   Medicare and Medicaid are not the key generators of these increases in medical costs.  Indeed, they are islands of modest constraint.  Republican mandates have barred Medicare and Medicaid from imposing far more effective cost constraints.  Debt hawks assume we will never learn from that mistake and will continue it for 70 years, at which point Medicare and Medicaid would represent roughly 100% of the federal budget.

    Projecting that U.S. health care costs will continue to increase at roughly twice the average growth rate of GDP guarantees that federal budget expenditures will be driven by health care costs.  Under the long-term scenarios that Samuelson relies on, Medicare would rise to approximately 10.5% of GDP by 2080.  By 2080, this implies that combined federal Medicare and Medicaid expenditures would exceed 20% of GDP – roughly 100% of the federal budget.  That is absurd, a point made forcefully by Federal Reserve economists in an article entitled:  AN EXAMINATION OF HEALTH-SPENDING GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES:

    PAST TRENDS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS (by Glenn Follette and Louise Sheiner).

    “All other” health care expenses would, under similar approaches to projections, rise to over 40% of GDP by 2080.  The overwhelming bulk of these expenses would be private health insurance and state contributions to Medicaid.  The first question that should arise, therefore, is which constraint would actually bite first and doom the projections.  The imminent constraint is not the federal budget.  The U.S. is neither a household nor a business firm.   We have a sovereign currency that we allow to freely float and we borrow in our own currency.  The U.S. federal government, therefore, is nothing like a nation that has joined the euro and given up its sovereign currency.  Like Japan, the U.S. can create money, or if it chooses to issue debt it can do so at minimal interest rates even with a debt to GDP ratio over twice as large as the current U.S. ratio.

    Businesses have to compete.  Many must already compete globally and the future will increase the number of firms that must maintain global competitiveness.  Foreign firms often provide no health care benefits to their workers.  U.S. businesses also have to compete against small U.S. businesses that are not subject to the employer mandate of Obamacare.  Decades before the U.S. federal government experiences ran into any real budgetary “crisis” the increase in health care costs that the CBO is projecting would bankrupt businesses that offered health insurance.  If health care costs increase indefinitely at twice the growth of GDP no business can long survive paying such costs.  The only question is how soon they will become uncompetitive and fail – and the business critics of Obamacare are claiming that we have already rendered them uncompetitive by requiring them to provide health insurance to a pool of very young workers in good health (i.e., a far cheaper pool to insure than would be the case for most professions and industries).

    The first point is that Samuelson has missed the real crisis and where it would cause the collapse of America decades before the federal government budget would be the relevant constraint.  The second point is that Samuelson fails to understand that if we cut the safety net we do not save anything – we simply transfer costs to less wealthy, sicker Americans and hospitals and their shareholders.  Medicare and Medicaid are not the major drivers of the large increase in health care costs relative to GDP growth.  They tend to constrain health care costs and, freed of Republican constraints on their rational operation, they would be far more effective in constraining health care cost increases.  Yes, as our population ages we will have greater demands for health care, but that is because our population ages – not because of Medicare.

    Our delivery system for health care, which relies primarily on private insurance, creates the perverse incentives that primarily explain the rapid increase in health care costs and why we spend roughly twice as much as a percentage of GDP for health care as our developed nations but report comparable or even inferior health outcomes.  If we do not contain the increase in health care costs and we cut the health care safety net we will not save money as a society, we will simply transfer (as did Paul Ryan’s health care voucher proposal) huge expenses to the those who get sick.  Many of them will be unable to pay, so if the government safety net is reduced the rapidly increasing expenses will either fall on hospitals and their shareholders in the form of unreimbursed expenses or people will die, suffer, and have their last years crippled.  Actually, both things will happen as hospitals seek to minimize a dramatic increase in unreimbursed care obligations.

    We could reduce our budgetary expenditures greatly in our wars if we used the draft and did not provide Veterans’ Administration, Medicare, or Medicaid health care for our returned troops.  That action would certainly be cruel and unjust, but it would also fail to save costs.  It would simply transfer the costs to our injured veterans.

    The third point is that we will change our practices and contain the cost escalation in health care.  We will do so because we have to and because it is smart to do so.  We know we will be able to change and dramatically reduce the escalation in costs because dozens of other nations have been able to do so through several different approaches and we can follow proven successes.  We have failed to do so at this juncture because of ideology, arrogance (if it’s not invented here it must not be useful), and because we are such a wealthy nation that we can survive our dogmatic failures for years.  In the end, however, we are pragmatists with a long record of choosing paths that work.  The problem in health care cost increases isn’t the safety net; it is ideologues like Samuelson who oppose measures to contain the increasing costs of health care.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/25/AR2009102502041.html

    William K. Black

    Categorie: Economia, Esteri

    6 Commenti

    1. Balbillus scrive:

      Questo è lunghetto, sarà pronto al più tardi per martedì

    2. Balbillus scrive:

      Il piano del Washingon Post è stato quella di creare un “panico sociale” che spingesse l’amministrazione Obama a superare le obiezioni dei senatori democratici per adottare il “Grande Patto” (sic) [il Grande Patto è un accordo per ridurre il deficit].
      Questo patto in realtà sarebbe un “Grande Tradimento”. Il tradimento dei principi del Partito Democratico infliggerebbe una recessione mediante una fortissima austerità fatta di ampi tagli ai programmi statali di sostegno ai poveri e a tutti gli altri programmi sociali [safety net + social programs = welfare, da adesso traduco così], con entrate fiscali modeste o moderate.

      Durante tutto il mese di dicembre il Post ha battuto sul fiscal cliff facendone la “paura del mese”. Questo uso del fiscal cliff per spaventare Obama e spingerlo verso il “Grande Tradimento” ha richiesto da parte di quelli che scrivono nel Post di spaventare anche noi mediante l’uso di due simultanei e contraddittori sermoni moraleggianti:
      1)Uno che sosteneva che era essenziale prevenire il fiscal cliff aderendo immediatamente al “Grande Patto” (leggesi: “Grande Tradimento”) perché senza accordo l’austerità ci avrebbe fatto ripiombare nella recessione e
      2) era essenziale che il “Grande Patto” imponesse un’austerità ancor più dura di quella che sarebbe stata causata dal fiscal cliff – per un’intera decade – perché solo l’austerità ci può salvare.

      Il fatto che i falchi pro-deficit del Post abbiano pensato che il modo migliore per spaventare Obama e spingerlo ad adottare misure di austerità fosse gridare che l’austerità del fiscal cliff provocherebbe un disastro e dovrebbe essere evitata adottando[paradossalmente] l’austerità ancora più dura del “Grande Tradimento” dimostra come essi sappiano benissimo di non avere argomenti validi in sostegno alla tesi che per contrastare la Grande Recessione serve l’austerità. Se avessero avuto una alternativa logica non avrebbero usato degli argomenti internamente contraddittori.

      I reporter del Post si sono rimbambiti a furia di seguire le idee di Pete Peterson. Peterson è il miliardario di Wall Street repubblicano che ha dedicato il resto della sua vita e 1 miliardo di dollari per lanciarsi all’assalto del welfare. Il fine supremo di peterson è quello di privatizzare la Previdenza Sociale in modo che Wall Street possa guadagnare miliardi di dollari gestendo i nostri risparmi per la pensione. I falchi del Post hanno visto in quale recessione non necessaria l’austerità a gettato l’Eurozona ma non vedono l’ora di infliggere anche a noi l’austerità anche se loro stessi predicono che questo causerà una recessione pure da noi.

      Le domande che volevo porre al post una volta che si fosse trovata una soluzione per il probelma del fiscla cliff erano

      1)quanto tempo vi ci vorrà per generare nuovo panico sociale e richiedere l’approvazione del Grande Tradimento

      2)come giustificherete la contraddittorietà del vostro messaggio che dice che l’austerità è la causa ma anche la soluzione del problema?

      La combinazione di forti tagli alla spesa pubblica e moderate o modeste entrate fiscali provoca un’austerità troppo dura per un paese la cui economia sta andando troppo al di sotto delle sue potenzialità e che soffre di alta disoccupazione e sottoimpiego. L’austerità del Grande Tradimento ci spingerà nuovamente in recessione. Dato che l’austerità durerà per un decennio le recessioni saranno molte e ancora più gravi.
      Come faranno a spacciare al pubblico delle recessioni più frequenti e più gravi per qualcosa di desiderabile?

      LA RISPOSTA ALLA PRIMA DOMANDA è STATA “MENO DI 24 ORE”. LA RISPOSTA ALLA SECONDA VARIA A SECONDA DEL FALCO CHE SCRIVE. NELL’OTTOBRE 2012 HO SCRITTO UN ARTICOLO A PROPOSITO DELL’INSTANCABILE SFORZO DI ROBERT SAMUELSON DI TERRORIZZARE IL PUBBLICO INTITOLATO: “R.J. SAMUELSON VUOLE PROVOCARE IL PANICO SOCIALE SULLA QUESTIONE DEL DEFICIT”. HO DENUNCIATO IN QUELL’ARTICOLO E NEL SEGUENTE LA SUA MENDACE PRESENTAZIONE DI UN MOVIMENTO VICINO A PETE PETERSON (THIRD WAY OSSIA TERZA VIA) COME UN GRUPPO “LIBERAL” CHE SOSTENEVA LE SUE POSIZIONI. TERZA VIA E’ PIUTTOSTO LA FILIALE DI WALL STREET A WASHINGTON.

      http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2012/10/robert-j-samuelson-tries-to-create-a-moral-panic-about-deficits.html

      La cosa che mi è piaciuta di più dell’articolo di Samuelson era che pretendeva che milioni di lavoratori accettassero senza protestare il fatto che avrebbero perso il lavoro a causa della recessione che l’austerità da lui proposta avrebbe certamente causato.

      “E’ molto triste per noi che voi o i vostri bambini piangiate tutta la notte dalla fame dopo che noi vi abbiamo tagliato i buoni alimentari”

      Come si fa a combattere con l’auto ironia involontaria?

      Bè, Samuelson è di nuovo alla carica, incazzato come un’ape perché Obama non è riuscito a convincere al Grande Tradimento il leader della maggioranza del senato Harry Reid – il quale ha letteralmente bruciato nel caminetto il suggerimento di arrendersi del Presidente.
      Appena è stato raggiunto l’accordo sul fiscal cliff Samuelson ha tuonato dicendo che era “un fallimento per la leadership presidenziale” dato che Obama non aveva acconsentito alle misure di austerità richieste dai repubblicani per far fronte alla Grande Recessione.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/robert-j-samuelson-obamas-leadership-failure/2012/12/31/fa34a9b6-5393-11e2-8b9e-dd8773594efc_story.html?hpid=z7

      Samuelson prima si lamenta che l’accordo sul fiscal cliff aumenta l’incremento marginale di imposta per il 2% più ricco fra la cittadinanza. Eppure anche così resta decisamente più basso che in qualsiasi guerra moderna.
      Sul serio questa è la preoccupazione maggiore di Samuelson? Samuelson scrive:

      “L’ossessione con le tasse ai ricchi è cattiva politica (diminuisce la voglia di rischiare, la voglia di lavorare e le nuove assunzioni) ma fa fare bella figura ai politici; fa capire che Obama è macho; fa il duro coi ricchi che sono implicitamente considerati responsabili dei problemi economici della nazione”.

      Molte falsità in una sola proposizione: primo non è un’ossessione ma solo un accordo sull’aumento delle tasse ai ricchi che per anni se le sono vuste diminuire. Se Samuelson fosse serio sulle “crisi da deficit” chiederebbe ancor più tasse sui ricchi e sul lungo periodo. Ma Samuelson è un burattino di Peterson e sostiene le richieste di Wall Street di diminuire ancora di più le tasse sul 2% più ricco della popolazione.

      Secondo, non esiste nessuna credibile evidenza che un piccolo e parziale ritorno a degli aumenti di tasse per i ricchi (pur sempre più basso dei minimi storici) possa avere un affetto negativo perché “diminuisce la voglia di rischiare, la voglia di lavorare e le nuove assunzioni”. Abbiamo sperimentato il peggio, la crescita negativa, proprio quando le tasse per i più ricchi erano bassissime.

      In compenso è cresciuta la disuguaglianza e sicuramente l’alta finanza, che rappresenta la maggioranza assoluta dei super ricchi americani, è la più colpevole per la Grande Recessione. Sono le loro truffe che li hanno arricchiti alle spalle della classe media negli ultimi 75 anni.
      Quindi mai e poi mai i ricchi americani avrebbero dovuto ricevere quei tagli sulle loro tasse e tutti gli altri vantaggi fiscali di cui hanno abusato arrivando spesso a pagare meno dei loro stessi impiegati.

      Essere reattivi contro la scorrettezza del potere e il suo abuso è una buona cosa in democrazia. Quello che Samuelson critica in realtà “buona democrazia”, non semplici misure di politica economica.

      Nessuno pensa che Obama sia un macho. I resoconti dei media per il 2011 lo descrivono con un debole negoziatore salvato dal disastro dai liberal del senato e dai Tea Party repubblicani alla camera.

      Ma Samuelson passa rapidamente alla Agenda Peterson – la Previdenza Sociale è nella sua lista di “tradimenti”.

      “La causa maggiore è che Obama rifiuta di ammettere che la Social Security, Medicaid e Medicaid faranno aumentare la spesa pubblica e il deficit. Quindi quando i repubblicani fanno concessioni sulle tasse ( e le hanno fatte) ottengono molto poco in cambio. Naturalmente questo avvelena il clima della discussione”.

      Perché la Previdenza Sociale è la prima della sua lista? In realtà sta producendo dei surplus non dei deficit. Samuelson odia i pensionati e letteralmente maledice gli americani anziani perché “rovinano l’america”. Pensa che ogni nonno sia una sanguisuga della “quinta colonna”. Sogna il giorno in cui i Ron Paul del mondo avranno finalmente il coraggio di buttare i nonni sotto l’autobus. Qui c’è il link a questo articolo che mette all’indice gli anziani.

      “PERCHE’ SIAMO IN QUESTO GUAIO DEL DEBITO? SONO GLI ANZIANI, STUPIDO”

      http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2011-07-28/opinions/35236744_1_social-security-federal-government-budget-and-debt

      Neppure Medicaid dovrebbe stare nella lista di Samuelson. Potremmo ridurre drasticamente Medicaid riducendo la disoccupazione e la povertà che sono uno spreco enorme per la società. Potremmo virtualmente eliminare la disoccupazione di lungo termine in qualsiasi momento creando un programma di lavoro garantito dal governo che aumenterebbe significativamente anche la crescita. Se riduciamo la disoccupazione riduciamo a povertà e Medicaid è rivolto ai poveri.

      Resta Medicare che in effetti, in maniera molto spinta, causa l’aumento di Congressional Budget Office sul lungo termine, come spesso Samuelson dice. Tornerò sugli argomenti di Samuelson sulle questioni del deficit di lungo termine ma c’è un problema più immediato che deve essere enfatizzato – nessuna delle sue tesi (nemmeno se fossero vere) potrebbe giustificare l’austerità in questo momento. L’austerità renderebbe tutte le difficoltà ancora peggiori.

      Non esiste una singola ragione economica in base alla quale infliggerci altra austerità nelle nostre circostanze. Abbiamo una crisi di disoccupazione non una crisi di debito. Samuelson ammette che:

      “Una economia debole crea pochi nuovi lavori e questa mancanza di posti di lavoro è il problema numero uno del paese”.

      Durante una recessione la disoccupazione cresce drammaticamente causando una diminuzione delle entrate fiscali e un aumento di spesa ad esempio per programmi di sostegno ai disoccupati (e l’opposto accade durante una crescita impetuosa se si ha inflazione).
      Questo processo è parte del sistema di compensazione (stabilizzatori fiscali) che noi e altre nazioni prudenti abbiamo costruito per le nostre economie.
      Il risultato è un’automatica (non si perde tempo in nuove legislazioni) politica fiscale contro ciclica che riduce la gravità della crisi economica. Le recessioni oggi sono mediamente meno pesanti di quello che erano prima senza gli stabilizzatori fiscali.

      Questa però non è una recessione 2media”. Si chiama la Grande Recessione proprio perché è più grave delle altre. Come ammette anche Samuelson quando si cerca di uscire da una Grande Recessione la domanda sarà fortemente inadeguata e si assumeranno poche persone rendendo il problema del lavoro il più grave per la nazione.
      Per aumentare i posti di lavoro e riprendersi velocemente da una Grande Recessione è essenziale che il governo entri in gioco per ripristinare il livello della domanda. L’ultima cosa da farsi è che il governo infligga l’austerità mediante aumenti (netti) di tasse e diminuzioni (nette) di spesa. Il più grave fallimento della leadership di obama non è stata la riduzione dell’imposta sul monte salari. Piuttosto NON avrebbe dovuto fare tagli alla spesa per compensare i repubblicani deglli aumenti di tasse ai più ricchi perché questo avrebbe inficiato la ripresa, come Samuelson ha ammesso.
      Obama avrebbe dovuto abbassare le tasse sui salariati delle classi basse e medie per assicurarsi che [nonostante gli aumenti ai più ricchi] non ci fosse un aumento “netto” della tassazione. Ridurre le tasse ai salariati avrebbe incrementato la domanda privata e avrebbe favorito la ripresa.

    3. Balbillus scrive:

      Ho postato due volte la prima parte della traduzione ma sembra che non l’accetti. Problemi?

    4. Balbillus scrive:

      SECONDA PARTE

      L’austerità è una politica pro-ciclica e rende la recessione più grave. E’ da analfabeti economici come è da analfabeti medici salassare il paziente. In un raro sprazzo di lucidità (subito oscurato dalla consueta incoerenza analitica) un reporter del Post, Zachary Goldfarb, ammette almeno questo punto nel primo inciso della prima frase.

      “L’accordo ratificato dalla Camera martedì scorso ridurrà gli effetti più gravi del fiscal cliff evitando una pericolosa dose di austerità…”

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/fiscal-cliff/fiscal-cliff-deal-does-little-to-tame-threats-from-debt-ceiling-high-unemployment-rates/2013/01/01/8e4c14aa-5393-11e2-bf3e-76c0a789346f_story.html

      Molto bene: anche Goldfarb dice che l’austerità è “pericolosa” e avrà gravi effetti sulla nostra economia. Bisognava evitarlo.

      Goldfarb osserva che l’accordo non riesce a disinnescare la minaccia repubblicana di usare il “tetto del debito” per ricattare Obama paventando il default a meno che il Presidente non decidesse di infliggere maggiore austerità alla nazione.
      Questa è una critica giusta e importante che Samuelson ignora perché smentirebbe i suoi proclami sulle buone visrtù dei repubblicani che verrebbero traviate da Obama. E’ consequenzialmente logico col primo argomento di Goldfarb – l’austerità sarebbe ubn disastro.

      Anche il punto successivo di Goldfarb è logicamente coerente.

      “Il pacchetto approvato non fa nulla per affrontare con decisione il problema della disoccupazione di 12 milioni di americani. Anzi potrebbe aggravare il problema. Lasciando scadere l’accordo sul taglio alle tasse sul monte salari si levano altri soldi dalle mani degli americani, dall’economia e si frena l’attività economica.

      E ancora una volta Goldfarb afferma che l’austerità è distruttiva.Poi le cose cominciano a impasticciarsi.

      “E infine l’accordo è troppo modesto per tamponare con decisione il debito pubblico. Il finanziamento a lungo termine del paese resta in pericolo con la spesa pubblica che è prevista in drammatico aumento dato che un’ondata di baby boomers [i moltissimi bambini nati nel boom economico che ora sono lavoratori adulti e in difficoltà] si rivolge al governo per chiedere aiuti per pagare le spese mediche sempre più care.”

      Improvvisamente il problema è che c’è poca austerità. Subito dopo aver spiegato che l’austerità rallenterebbe l’economia Goldfarb dice che l’accordo prevede troppo poca austerità. E la pone non come opinione ma come dato di fatto. Lo dice senza rendersi conto dell’incoerenza interna delle sue parole. Osservate che implicitamente ammette che i problemi chiave sono i costi per le spese mediche e Medicare, non la Social Security e Medicaid.

      L’articolo sembra riprendersi ma solo per ripiombare nella più totale incoerenza.

      ALCUNI BENEFICI

      “Nonostante i lati negativi l’accordo bipartisan è stato il più impegnativo mai approvato da un Congresso così diviso. E il pacchetto indubbiamente ha i suoi vantaggi.

      Probabilmente eviterà alla nazione di ricadere nella recessione. Cancellerà grandi aumenti di tasse che sarebbero gravati sulle classi medie e povere americane. E ritarda ampi e brutali tagli alla spesa pubblica per due mesi.

      E mentre non riduce l’occupazione rinnova i sussidi alla disoccupazione che altrimenti sarebbero cessati offrendo un importante sostegno ai senza lavoro e non rallentando l’economia.

      E infine raccogliendo più di 600 miliardi in nuove entrate fiscali dalle tasse ai più ricchi questo accordo fa un passo avanti verso l’obiettivo di portare la spesa e le tasse in linea per i prossimi anni – anche se vari economisti sostengono che c’è ancora molto da fare nel lungo periodo.

      Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.
      Avrebbe anche voluto fornire più stimolo economico per ridurre la disoccupazione e prolungare i tagli di tasse ai salariati.

      I repubblicani avrebbero voluto maggiori tagli al deficit ma con una ricetta opposta a quella di Obama; invece delle tasse ai salariati volevano tagliare la spesa pubblica e cambiare le modalità di accesso a certi diritti di welfare”

      Le prime due frasi sono coerenti – evitando l’austerità evitiamo la recessione. E’ una cosa incredibilmente importante.

      La terza cade in contraddizione.

      “E mentre l’accordo non fa nulla per ridurre la disoccupazione, rinnova il sostegno ai senza lavoro che altrimenti sarebbero stati tolti, offre un aiuto vitale per i discossupati e evita un altro colpo all’economia”

      Goldfarb ha appena spiegato che l’accordo probabilmente eviterà una recessione bloccando l’austerità conseguente al fiscal cliff (aumjento di tasse e tagli di spesa) e quindi si fa un enorme sforzo nella direzione della riduzione della disoccupazione bloccando l’austerità. E non si rende conto di un’altra auto-contraddizione. Prolungando gli aiuti ai disoccupati che stavano per scadere e quindi estendendoli a circa due milioni di altri lavoratori finiti senza lavoro nel frattempo si crea più domanda e quindi si riduce la disoccupazione.

      Ma si va sempre peggio. La prossima frase di Goldfarb prelude a un’ode all’austerità.

      “E infine raccogliendo più di 600 miliardi in nuove entrate fiscali dalle tasse ai più ricchi questo accordo fa un passo avanti verso l’obiettivo di portare la spesa e le tasse in linea per i prossimi anni – anche se vari economisti sostengono che c’è ancora molto da fare nel lungo periodo.”

      No, l’aumento netto delle tasse è una misura di austerità.
      L’austerità non necessariamente rimette in linea spesa e tasse per i prossimi anni. E’ molto più probabile che così si produca quello che diceva prima Goldfarb e cioè che si cada in una recessione non necessaria che ovviamente aumenterà la disoccupazione e il deficit.

      La quinta frase di Goldfarb lo porta del tutto fuori strada (ma dimostra che Samuelson ha sbagliato a criticare Obama).

      “Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.
      Avrebbe anche voluto fornire più stimolo economico per ridurre la disoccupazione e prolungare i tagli di tasse ai salariati.”

      Goldfarb illustra quello che molti di noi annunciavano già prima delle elezioni del 2012. Obama voleva fare il Grande Tradimento nel 2011, 2012 e all’inizio del 2013. Voleva infliggere “forti tagli di spesa con più tasse e più risparmi mirati in…Medicare e Social Security”.
      Notate che qui Goldfarb descrive l’incoerenza di obama sull’austerità. Ricordate, se Obama avesse raggiunto il suo scopo a Luglio o Novembre 2011 – il Grande Tradimento – avrebbe dato il via a un programma di austerità che avrebbe scaraventato gli USA in recessione, causato un aumento della disoccupazione, distrutto le sue chance di rielezione, e fatto perdere il senato ai Democratici. I consiglieri chiave di Obama, nell’autunno 2011 – Treasury Secretary Geithner, Chief of Staff William Daley, e il capo di OBM Jacob Lew – sono tutti dei rappresentanti della corrente vicina a Wall Street fra i democratici che generalmente si oppongono agli stimoli e prediligono l’austerità. Lew è considerato il più papabile per rimpiazzare Geithner al Tesoro.

      “Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.”

      Ho capito che Goldfarb sta illustrando gli obiettivi di Obama qui ma la sua mancanza di comprensione dell’economia è così importante nell’intera storia che se Goldfarb avesse voluto mostrare gli errori di Obama avrebbe dovuto approfondire questo passaggio. Obama pensava che … “i tagli di spesa” “i risparmi mirati in Medicare e Social Security” avrebbero fatto slittare “più tasse”.

      [passaggio difficilissimo perché riprende una frase di Goldfarb e la rigira. In sostanza mette in luce l'assurdità di pensare automaticamente antagonisti i tagli con il "più tasse" in austerità.]

      Quando c’è di mezzo l’austerità i tagli di spesa non evitano “più tasse” ma spingono verso una austerità ancora maggiore. Obama voleva fare una doppia dose di austerità (tagli E più tasse). Lo avesse fatto adesso stavamo in recessione. Goldfarb e Obama sembrano credere che aumento di tasse e taglio di spesa si respingono quando si tratta di austerità, come la prossima frase conferma:
      “(Obama) aveva anche richiesto misure di stimolo per diminuire la disoccupazione, incluso un prolungamento dei tagli alle tasse dei salariati”: Ecco, questo era per lo stimolo ma né Obama né Goldfarb sembrano capire che l’effetto netto di “cambi” su tasse e spesa sono la chiave per determinare se il bilancio così pianificato ci porta austerità o stimolo. Ma sia su spesa che tasse il piano di Obama sarebbe stato recessivo.

      Allo stesso modo anche la descrizione di Goldfarb del piano dei repubblicani, ancora peggio di quello di Obama, dimostra come né lui né i repubblicani capiscono l’economia.

      “I repubblicani avrebbero voluto maggiori tagli al deficit ma con una ricetta opposta a quella di Obama; invece delle tasse ai salariati volevano tagliare la spesa pubblica e cambiare le modalità di accesso a certi diritti di welfare”

      L’errore qui è sottile ma importante – l’idea che tagli ancora più pronunciati alla spesa pubblica (e al welfare) ridurrebbero il deficit più che la proposta di Obama.
      Obama e i repubblicani volevano entrambi infliggere l’austerità alla nazione in un momento in cui siamo ancora ad anni di distanza dalla soluzione della Grande Recessione. Questo, come dice Goldfarb ci avrebbe gettato in una ulteriore recessione, come in Europa. Una nuova recessione avrebbe aumentato la disoccupazione, ridotte ke entrate fiscali, aumentato le spese. Il risultato pià probabile sarebbe un aumento del deficit sia col piano Obama che con quello dei Repubblicani. Ma sarebbe stato peggio con quello dei Repubblicani perchè volevano più austerità

      [mannaggia a questo come scrive male!]

      Una recessione avviene quando la domanda è così inadeguata che la crescita economica diventa negativa il che porta a grossi aumenti di disoccupazione e sotto occupazione. I sostenitori dell’austerità dicono in sostanza. abbiamo un deficit di un miliardo, aumentiamo le tasse di 500 milioni, tagliamo la spesa per 500 milioni e abbiamo ripianato.
      Ma questo implica che il bufget federale non ha impatto sull’economia.
      Ma non è vero. Tutti oggi sono d’accordo nel dire che questo infliggerebbe austerità alla nazione e ci porterebbe stupidamente in recessione. Ecco perché adesso concordano nel dire che il fiscal cliff andava evitato. )Il governatore Dean è l’eccezione che conferma la regola. Voleva gettarsi a capofitto nel fiscal cliff proprio per ottenere l’austerità forzata. Aveva predetto solo sei mesi di recessione e decantava i sacrifici (fatti da altri, i disoccupati, non lui) che avrebbero trasgformato l’America in un posto molto migliore. Sembrava tua nonna che raccontava quanto gli fa bene il clistere).
      Ma adesso anche un medico come Dean ammette che l’austerità porta alla recessione. Questo è quello che ha fatto in Europa (a parte il fatto che Spagna, Grecia, Italia hanno livelli di disoccupazione non da Grande Recessione ma da Grande Depressione).

      Le nuove opinioni sul fiscal cliff comunque non spiegano perché l’austerità che ne deriverebbe porti a una recessione e a un ampliamento del deficit.
      Detto in breve: aumentare le tasse in Grande Recessione riduce la domanda privata in un economia che già ha una crisi da domanda. Il grosso della spesa pubblica non serve a pagare gli stipendi dei dipendenti pubblici ma a comprare beni e servizi dal settore privato (e anche gli stipendi vengono usati per comprare beni e servizi privati).
      Risucendo ulteriormente la domanda l’austerità peggiora la recessione e forza la nazione in una depressione il che causa disoccupazione e sotto occupazione.
      Il calo nell’impiego riduce le entrate fiscali e aumenta la spesa pubblica. Il risultato dell’austerità durante la Grande Recessione è di aumentare il deficit, peggiorare la recessione, la miseria delle persone (in seguito ai tagli di spesa pubblica), la disoccupazione.
      L’austerità è una strategia perdente.
      Gli stimoli fiscali invece creano crescita, impiego, entrate fiscali, meno miseria e sostegno finanziario da parte dello stato.
      Aumentando le entrate fiscali e riducendo la necessità di sostegni alla disoccupazione si riduce il deficit e lo Stimolo è una strategia assolutamente vincente.

    5. Balbillus scrive:

      ULTIMA PARTE

      L’austerità è una politica pro-ciclica e rende la recessione più grave. E’ da analfabeti economici come è da analfabeti medici salassare il paziente. In un raro sprazzo di lucidità (subito oscurato dalla consueta incoerenza analitica) un reporter del Post, Zachary Goldfarb, ammette almeno questo punto nel primo inciso della prima frase.

      “L’accordo ratificato dalla Camera martedì scorso ridurrà gli effetti più gravi del fiscal cliff evitando una pericolosa dose di austerità…”

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/fiscal-cliff/fiscal-cliff-deal-does-little-to-tame-threats-from-debt-ceiling-high-unemployment-rates/2013/01/01/8e4c14aa-5393-11e2-bf3e-76c0a789346f_story.html

      Molto bene: anche Goldfarb dice che l’austerità è “pericolosa” e avrà gravi effetti sulla nostra economia. Bisognava evitarlo.

      Goldfarb osserva che l’accordo non riesce a disinnescare la minaccia repubblicana di usare il “tetto del debito” per ricattare Obama paventando il default a meno che il Presidente non decidesse di infliggere maggiore austerità alla nazione.
      Questa è una critica giusta e importante che Samuelson ignora perché smentirebbe i suoi proclami sulle buone visrtù dei repubblicani che verrebbero traviate da Obama. E’ consequenzialmente logico col primo argomento di Goldfarb – l’austerità sarebbe ubn disastro.

      Anche il punto successivo di Goldfarb è logicamente coerente.

      “Il pacchetto approvato non fa nulla per affrontare con decisione il problema della disoccupazione di 12 milioni di americani. Anzi potrebbe aggravare il problema. Lasciando scadere l’accordo sul taglio alle tasse sul monte salari si levano altri soldi dalle mani degli americani, dall’economia e si frena l’attività economica.

      E ancora una volta Goldfarb afferma che l’austerità è distruttiva.Poi le cose cominciano a impasticciarsi.

      “E infine l’accordo è troppo modesto per tamponare con decisione il debito pubblico. Il finanziamento a lungo termine del paese resta in pericolo con la spesa pubblica che è prevista in drammatico aumento dato che un’ondata di baby boomers [i moltissimi bambini nati nel boom economico che ora sono lavoratori adulti e in difficoltà] si rivolge al governo per chiedere aiuti per pagare le spese mediche sempre più care.”

      Improvvisamente il problema è che c’è poca austerità. Subito dopo aver spiegato che l’austerità rallenterebbe l’economia Goldfarb dice che l’accordo prevede troppo poca austerità. E la pone non come opinione ma come dato di fatto. Lo dice senza rendersi conto dell’incoerenza interna delle sue parole. Osservate che implicitamente ammette che i problemi chiave sono i costi per le spese mediche e Medicare, non la Social Security e Medicaid.

      L’articolo sembra riprendersi ma solo per ripiombare nella più totale incoerenza.

      ALCUNI BENEFICI

      “Nonostante i lati negativi l’accordo bipartisan è stato il più impegnativo mai approvato da un Congresso così diviso. E il pacchetto indubbiamente ha i suoi vantaggi.

      Probabilmente eviterà alla nazione di ricadere nella recessione. Cancellerà grandi aumenti di tasse che sarebbero gravati sulle classi medie e povere americane. E ritarda ampi e brutali tagli alla spesa pubblica per due mesi.

      E mentre non riduce l’occupazione rinnova i sussidi alla disoccupazione che altrimenti sarebbero cessati offrendo un importante sostegno ai senza lavoro e non rallentando l’economia.

      E infine raccogliendo più di 600 miliardi in nuove entrate fiscali dalle tasse ai più ricchi questo accordo fa un passo avanti verso l’obiettivo di portare la spesa e le tasse in linea per i prossimi anni – anche se vari economisti sostengono che c’è ancora molto da fare nel lungo periodo.

      Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.
      Avrebbe anche voluto fornire più stimolo economico per ridurre la disoccupazione e prolungare i tagli di tasse ai salariati.

      I repubblicani avrebbero voluto maggiori tagli al deficit ma con una ricetta opposta a quella di Obama; invece delle tasse ai salariati volevano tagliare la spesa pubblica e cambiare le modalità di accesso a certi diritti di welfare”

      Le prime due frasi sono coerenti – evitando l’austerità evitiamo la recessione. E’ una cosa incredibilmente importante.

      La terza cade in contraddizione.

      “E mentre l’accordo non fa nulla per ridurre la disoccupazione, rinnova il sostegno ai senza lavoro che altrimenti sarebbero stati tolti, offre un aiuto vitale per i discossupati e evita un altro colpo all’economia”

      Goldfarb ha appena spiegato che l’accordo probabilmente eviterà una recessione bloccando l’austerità conseguente al fiscal cliff (aumjento di tasse e tagli di spesa) e quindi si fa un enorme sforzo nella direzione della riduzione della disoccupazione bloccando l’austerità. E non si rende conto di un’altra auto-contraddizione. Prolungando gli aiuti ai disoccupati che stavano per scadere e quindi estendendoli a circa due milioni di altri lavoratori finiti senza lavoro nel frattempo si crea più domanda e quindi si riduce la disoccupazione.

      Ma si va sempre peggio. La prossima frase di Goldfarb prelude a un’ode all’austerità.

      “E infine raccogliendo più di 600 miliardi in nuove entrate fiscali dalle tasse ai più ricchi questo accordo fa un passo avanti verso l’obiettivo di portare la spesa e le tasse in linea per i prossimi anni – anche se vari economisti sostengono che c’è ancora molto da fare nel lungo periodo.”

      No, l’aumento netto delle tasse è una misura di austerità.
      L’austerità non necessariamente rimette in linea spesa e tasse per i prossimi anni. E’ molto più probabile che così si produca quello che diceva prima Goldfarb e cioè che si cada in una recessione non necessaria che ovviamente aumenterà la disoccupazione e il deficit.

      La quinta frase di Goldfarb lo porta del tutto fuori strada (ma dimostra che Samuelson ha sbagliato a criticare Obama).

      “Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.
      Avrebbe anche voluto fornire più stimolo economico per ridurre la disoccupazione e prolungare i tagli di tasse ai salariati.”

      Goldfarb illustra quello che molti di noi annunciavano già prima delle elezioni del 2012. Obama voleva fare il Grande Tradimento nel 2011, 2012 e all’inizio del 2013. Voleva infliggere “forti tagli di spesa con più tasse e più risparmi mirati in…Medicare e Social Security”.
      Notate che qui Goldfarb descrive l’incoerenza di obama sull’austerità. Ricordate, se Obama avesse raggiunto il suo scopo a Luglio o Novembre 2011 – il Grande Tradimento – avrebbe dato il via a un programma di austerità che avrebbe scaraventato gli USA in recessione, causato un aumento della disoccupazione, distrutto le sue chance di rielezione, e fatto perdere il senato ai Democratici. I consiglieri chiave di Obama, nell’autunno 2011 – Treasury Secretary Geithner, Chief of Staff William Daley, e il capo di OBM Jacob Lew – sono tutti dei rappresentanti della corrente vicina a Wall Street fra i democratici che generalmente si oppongono agli stimoli e prediligono l’austerità. Lew è considerato il più papabile per rimpiazzare Geithner al Tesoro.

      “Obama avrebbe voluto aumentare le tasse ai ricchi di più del doppio di quello che è riuscito a ottenere. Avrebbe anche voluto levare dal tavolo delle trattative la questione del tetto al debito e far slittare i tagli di spesa più pesanti con più tasse e concessione di diritti più mirata – incluso per Medicare e Social Security.”

      Ho capito che Goldfarb sta illustrando gli obiettivi di Obama qui ma la sua mancanza di comprensione dell’economia è così importante nell’intera storia che se Goldfarb avesse voluto mostrare gli errori di Obama avrebbe dovuto approfondire questo passaggio. Obama pensava che … “i tagli di spesa” “i risparmi mirati in Medicare e Social Security” avrebbero fatto slittare “più tasse”.

      [passaggio difficilissimo perché riprende una frase di Goldfarb e la rigira. In sostanza mette in luce l'assurdità di pensare automaticamente antagonisti i tagli con il "più tasse" in austerità.]

      Quando c’è di mezzo l’austerità i tagli di spesa non evitano “più tasse” ma spingono verso una austerità ancora maggiore. Obama voleva fare una doppia dose di austerità (tagli E più tasse). Lo avesse fatto adesso stavamo in recessione. Goldfarb e Obama sembrano credere che aumento di tasse e taglio di spesa si respingono quando si tratta di austerità, come la prossima frase conferma:
      “(Obama) aveva anche richiesto misure di stimolo per diminuire la disoccupazione, incluso un prolungamento dei tagli alle tasse dei salariati”: Ecco, questo era per lo stimolo ma né Obama né Goldfarb sembrano capire che l’effetto netto di “cambi” su tasse e spesa sono la chiave per determinare se il bilancio così pianificato ci porta austerità o stimolo. Ma sia su spesa che tasse il piano di Obama sarebbe stato recessivo.

      Allo stesso modo anche la descrizione di Goldfarb del piano dei repubblicani, ancora peggio di quello di Obama, dimostra come né lui né i repubblicani capiscono l’economia.

      “I repubblicani avrebbero voluto maggiori tagli al deficit ma con una ricetta opposta a quella di Obama; invece delle tasse ai salariati volevano tagliare la spesa pubblica e cambiare le modalità di accesso a certi diritti di welfare”

      L’errore qui è sottile ma importante – l’idea che tagli ancora più pronunciati alla spesa pubblica (e al welfare) ridurrebbero il deficit più che la proposta di Obama.
      Obama e i repubblicani volevano entrambi infliggere l’austerità alla nazione in un momento in cui siamo ancora ad anni di distanza dalla soluzione della Grande Recessione. Questo, come dice Goldfarb ci avrebbe gettato in una ulteriore recessione, come in Europa. Una nuova recessione avrebbe aumentato la disoccupazione, ridotte ke entrate fiscali, aumentato le spese. Il risultato pià probabile sarebbe un aumento del deficit sia col piano Obama che con quello dei Repubblicani. Ma sarebbe stato peggio con quello dei Repubblicani perchè volevano più austerità

      [mannaggia a questo come scrive male!]

      Una recessione avviene quando la domanda è così inadeguata che la crescita economica diventa negativa il che porta a grossi aumenti di disoccupazione e sotto occupazione. I sostenitori dell’austerità dicono in sostanza. abbiamo un deficit di un miliardo, aumentiamo le tasse di 500 milioni, tagliamo la spesa per 500 milioni e abbiamo ripianato.
      Ma questo implica che il bufget federale non ha impatto sull’economia.
      Ma non è vero. Tutti oggi sono d’accordo nel dire che questo infliggerebbe austerità alla nazione e ci porterebbe stupidamente in recessione. Ecco perché adesso concordano nel dire che il fiscal cliff andava evitato. )Il governatore Dean è l’eccezione che conferma la regola. Voleva gettarsi a capofitto nel fiscal cliff proprio per ottenere l’austerità forzata. Aveva predetto solo sei mesi di recessione e decantava i sacrifici (fatti da altri, i disoccupati, non lui) che avrebbero trasgformato l’America in un posto molto migliore. Sembrava tua nonna che raccontava quanto gli fa bene il clistere).
      Ma adesso anche un medico come Dean ammette che l’austerità porta alla recessione. Questo è quello che ha fatto in Europa (a parte il fatto che Spagna, Grecia, Italia hanno livelli di disoccupazione non da Grande Recessione ma da Grande Depressione).

      Le nuove opinioni sul fiscal cliff comunque non spiegano perché l’austerità che ne deriverebbe porti a una recessione e a un ampliamento del deficit.
      Detto in breve: aumentare le tasse in Grande Recessione riduce la domanda privata in un economia che già ha una crisi da domanda. Il grosso della spesa pubblica non serve a pagare gli stipendi dei dipendenti pubblici ma a comprare beni e servizi dal settore privato (e anche gli stipendi vengono usati per comprare beni e servizi privati).
      Risucendo ulteriormente la domanda l’austerità peggiora la recessione e forza la nazione in una depressione il che causa disoccupazione e sotto occupazione.
      Il calo nell’impiego riduce le entrate fiscali e aumenta la spesa pubblica. Il risultato dell’austerità durante la Grande Recessione è di aumentare il deficit, peggiorare la recessione, la miseria delle persone (in seguito ai tagli di spesa pubblica), la disoccupazione.
      L’austerità è una strategia perdente.
      Gli stimoli fiscali invece creano crescita, impiego, entrate fiscali, meno miseria e sostegno finanziario da parte dello stato.
      Aumentando le entrate fiscali e riducendo la necessità di sostegni alla disoccupazione si riduce il deficit e lo Stimolo è una strategia assolutamente vincente.

      Pwer essere precisi ciò che conta è l’incremento netto. Va bene terminare dei programmi governativi stupidi a spostare fondi su altri migliori. Questo riguarda sia la spesa che le tasse ma un programma da 50 miliardi per il miglioramento professionale dei lavoratori non risolve da solo a meno che non ripristiniamo una domanda sufficiente a supportare un aumento dell’occupazione. Una delle migliori idee di obama è stata quella di una redistribuzione delle entrate tra i vari stati dell’ unione (un’idea repubblicana) perché sapeva che la Grande recessione avrebbe creato molte crisi di bilancio in vari stati. Gli stati dell’unione non hanno una loro moneta e quindi devono necessariamente adottare politiche pro cicliche. Licenziano lavoratori e tagliano la spesa mentre dovrebbero fare il contrario come dimostrano le statistiche. Abbiamo bisogno di un programma che garantisca un lavoro a tutti quelli in grado di lavorare ma nessuno dei due partiti approva un’idea simile.

      Ridurre le tasse ai ricchi è una risposta sbagliata in recessione perché non aumenta i loro consumi quanto li aumenterebbe invece un taglio a quelle dei lavoratori. L’unica riduzione buona di tasse è quella che riguarda il monte salari. Fornisce stimolo immediato senza spese materiali amministrative. Le tasse sul monte salari sono le più regressive quindi il taglio darebbe una forte spinta alla domanda. Aiuterebbe quelli in difficoltà.La peggiore decisione in assoluto relativa al fiscal cliff è stata il rifiuto di prolungare la moratoria sulle tasse sul monte salari.

      Come con la spesa così per le tasse è l’incremento (o decremento) netto quello che conta.
      Si potrebbe aumentare il coefficiente per i più ricchi e diminuire le tasse sui salari. L’effetto sarebbe quello che ho appena spiegato

      [Moralista: Black non lo si può tradurre letteralmente perché ripete di continuo le stesse frasi quindi le eccessive ripetizioni le salto. Non ti preoccupare che non perdi nulla del senso generali ma nemmeno dei dettagli. Repetita iuvant ma Black ha fatto di questo motto una missione!]

      Con questi concetti macro economici in mente possiamo sfrondare la discussione sul fiscal cliff. Non vogliamo “versare un anticipo” di diminuzione del deficit, sarebbe una soluzione perdente e sarebbe più che altro “un anticipo di recessione”.

      Il momento di alzare le tasse (nette) e/o tagliare la spesa (netta) sarà solo quando avremo raggiunto la piena occupazione e l’inflazione comincerà a diventare un problema. Entrambi i fattori vanno considerati. Se avremo piena occupazione senza grossa inflazione avremo una crescita fortissima e il deficit comincerà a calare. Avrete letto da Peterson e dai suoi accoliti che abbiamo un deficit strutturae di lungo termine che ha bisogno di una politica di austerità. Abbiamo dimostrato che questo è falso. E’ òa Grande Recessione che ha ampliato il deficit. Questo è quello che fanno tutte le recessioni. Per questo è un’idea assurda risolvere una recessione tagliando il deficit.

      Sono la crescita e la ripresa che fanno scendere il deficit. Dato che gli USA hanno avuto il buon senso di non praticare l’austerità (che ha provocato tanti disastri in eurozona) non siamo ancora caduti in una nuova recessione. Lo stimolo è stato molto più piccolo di quello che avrebbe docuto essere ma sufficiente per creare crescita e il deficit è sceso a livelli record. Non siamo in una crisi di deficit o di debito pubblico come dimostrano i bond USA a lungo termine.

      C’è un problema strutturale nella nostra economia e cioè l fatto che i costi della Previdenza Sociale (medica) sono saliti più di quanto sia cresciuta l’economia. Invece le spes di sostegno sociale non pongono problemi. Le spese mediche costano perché usano risorse reali che al contrario dei soldi sono “scarse” e limitate.
      Questi sono i tre punti fondamentali riguardanti i tagli a Medicare e Medicaid.
      Primo: se hanno ragione sul fatto che i costi delle spese della Mutua saliranno nei prossimi 70 anni allora Medicare e Medicaid sono l’ultimo dei nostri problemi.Siamo un unicum fra le nazioni sviluppate (ma sottosviluppate in quanto a comprensione dell’economia). Paghiamo le spese della Mutua principalmente attraverso le assicurazioni private e quindi non abbiamo un sistema di contenimento dei costi. Questa combinazione è un’idiozia e se non impareremo dalla nostra esperienza o da quella delle nazioni a noi simili allora le spese mediche saliranno più del PIL. Medicare e Medicaid non sono responsabili di questi aumenti, anzi. I falchi del debito sostangono che di questo passo fra 70 Medicare e Medicaid costituiranno il 100% del budget federale.

      Samuelson dice che nel 2080 Medicare sarà al 10,5% del PIL e quindi Medicare più Medicaid faranno il 20% del PIL ossia il 100% del budget federale.

      Questo è assurdo come si rileva in questo studio della Federal Reserve in un articolo intitolato

      ESAME DELLA CRESCITA DELLA SPESA MEDICA NEGLI USA

      TENDENZE E PREVISIONI (Glenn Follette e Louise Sheiner)

      “Tutte le altre” spese mediche potrebbero arrivare oltre il 40% del PIL per il 2080. La stragrande maggior parte dovuto a assicurazioni private e contributi statali a Medicaid. La prima domanda è quale limite sarà raggiunto prima. Non il bilancio federale perché gli USA non sono né una famiglia né un’impresa. Abbiamo una moneta sovrana che è libera di fluttuare e otteniamo prestiti nella nostra valuta. Anche se il rapporto debito PIL fosse due volte peggiore dell’attuale potremmo emettere bond a un tasso molto basso.

      Molte aziende si trovano a competere su scala globale e ce ne saranno sempre di più. Aziende straniere spesso non forniscono assicurazione sanitaria ai loro lavoratori. Le grandi aziende americane devono competere con le piccole americane che non hanno gli obblighi imposti dal piano obamacare. L’aumento progressivo previsto dalle previsioni del CBO porterà alla bancarotta quelle grandi aziende obbligate a formire assicurazione sanitaria. Il punto è “quando succederà”? Quando diventeranno davvero meno competitive?

      Il primo punto è che Samuelson ha già sbagliato a prevedere la vera crisi che distruggerà il budget americano decenni prima che arrivi il problema delle spese mediche insostenibili.
      Secondo punto, Samuelson non capisce che tagliando le spese di sostegno sociale in generale non risparmiamo nullama semplicemente trasferiamo costi ai meno ricchi, ai malati, agli ospedali e ai loro azionisti. Medicare e Medicaid non saranno i responsabili dell’aumento vertiginoso delle spese mediche previsto peer il futuro. Al contrario aiutano a limitare l’aumento di spesa soprattutto se liberati dalla pressione dei repubblicani. Sì la popolazione invecchia e questo aumenterà la spesa medica ma la vecchiaia e il numero dei cittadini sono il problema, non i programmi come Medicaid e Medicare.

      Il problema è che la nostra Mutua si basa sulle assicurazioni private e questo causa gli aumenti di spesa e anche la bassa qualità del servizio paragonato a quello delle altre nazioni del nostro livello.
      Se non conteniamo l’aumento di spesa [problema delle assicurazioni private] e tagliamo la protezione sociale ci limitiamo a trasferire la spesa ai più poveri come avrebbe fatto il piano di Ron paul. Le persone non in grado di pagare si riverserebbero sugli ospedali pubblici portando il sistema al collasso.

      Per esempio potremmo limitare la spesa di guerra evitando di sostenere finanziariamente i reduci feriti; sarebbe un bel risparmio ma sarebbe anche un semplice trasferimento di spesa dallo stato ai reduci, un’azione crudele, ingiusta e non utile economicamente.

      Terzo: cambiamo la prassi e conteniamo la spesa come hanno fatto molte altre nazioni con successo. Noi non riusciamo a farlo per un pregiudizio ideologico, per arroganza (se non lo abbiamo inventato noi non è una buona idea), perché siamo così ricchi che possiamo sopravvivere anni nonostante l’assurdità delle nostre politiche economiche.
      Il problema della spesa crescente per la Mutua non è nell’idea di offrire un sostegno sociale ma nelle ideologie come quella di Samuelson che si oppone al contenimento razionale della spesa medica.

      William Black

    Commenta a Balbillus


    "nella mia vita ho conosciuto farabutti che non erano moralisti ma raramente dei moralisti che non erano farabutti." (Indro Montanelli)


    E’ IN ATTO UNA...

    Scritto il 19 - lug - 2019

    0 Commenti

    IL GOVERNO TECNICO C’E’...

    Scritto il 15 - lug - 2019

    0 Commenti

    LA CRISI IRREVERSIBILE DEL...

    Scritto il 13 - lug - 2019

    0 Commenti

    DALLA VAL BREMBANA CON...

    Scritto il 12 - lug - 2019

    0 Commenti

    LE PRIVATIZZAZIONI DIFESE DA...

    Scritto il 11 - nov - 2013

    4 Comment1

    L’OLOCAUSTO GRECO SPIEGATO CON...

    Scritto il 27 - gen - 2014

    4 Comment1

    ALZARE IL CAPPUCCIO DEL...

    Scritto il 25 - mag - 2012

    3 Comment1

    LA DESOLANTE INUTILITA’ DELLE...

    Scritto il 22 - nov - 2017

    2 Comment1

    LA PROFEZIA DI SACCOMANNI:...

    Scritto il 7 - ago - 2013

    3 Comment1

    • Chi è il moralista

      Francesco Maria Toscano, nato a Gioia Tauro il 28/05/1979 è giornalista pubblicista e avvocato. Ha scritto per Luigi Pellegrini Editore il saggio storico politico "Capolinea". Ha collaborato con la "Gazzetta del Sud" ed è opinionista politico per la trasmissione televisiva "Perfidia" in onda su Telespazio Calabria.

    • Cos’è il moralista

      Sito di approfondimento politico, storico e culturale. Si occupa di temi di attualità con uno sguardo libero e disincantato sulle cose. Il Moralista è un personaggio complesso, indeciso tra l'accettazione di una indigeribile realtà e il desiderio di contribuire alla creazione di una società capace di riscoprire sentimenti nobili. Ogni giorno il Moralista commenterà le notizie che la cronaca propone col piglio di chi non deve servire nessuno se non la ricerca della verità. Una ricerca naturalmente relativa e quindi soggettiva, ma onesta e leale.

    • Disclaimer

      ilmoralista.it è un sito web con aggiornamenti aperiodici non a scopo di lucro, non rientrante nella categoria di Prodotto Editoriale secondo la Legge n.62 del 7 marzo 2001. Tutti i contenuti appartengono ai relativi proprietari, qualora voleste richiedere la rimozione di un contenuto a voi appartenente siete pregati di contattarci tramite la apposita pagina.